Gallifrey Returns… in the Oort Cloud?

Gallifrey Returns… in the Oort Cloud?

Yesterday, I wrote that there is a possibility (but certainly not a probability) that there exists two dark, icy super-Earths somewhere beyond the Oort Cloud of our solar system. There could be at least two unknown planets hidden well beyond Pluto, whose gravitational influence determines the orbits and strange distribution of objects observed beyond Neptune.Read more about Gallifrey Returns… in the Oort Cloud?[…]

Are Scientists on the Verge of Locating the Sith Homeworld?

Are Scientists on the Verge of Locating the Sith Homeworld?

From the Daily Galaxy: There could be at least two unknown planets hidden well beyond Pluto, whose gravitational influence determines the orbits and strange distribution of objects observed beyond Neptune. This has been revealed by numerical calculations made by researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the University of Cambridge. If confirmed, this hypothesisRead more about Are Scientists on the Verge of Locating the Sith Homeworld?[…]

STOP Trying to Make Pluto a Planet Again!

STOP Trying to Make Pluto a Planet Again!

… Or Pluto is a Ball of Rock & Ice, not a Cartoon Dog

A few years ago, the International Astronomical Union standardized the definition of a planet and as such declassified Pluto. According to the IAU, the current official definition of a planet is a celestial body that

1. is in orbit around the Sun, 2. is round or nearly round, and 3. has “cleared the neighborhood” around its orbit

Pluto was declassified down to a dwarf-planet. The international outcry was enormous. And STUPID. Because this:

pluto

I would contend that the outcry about Pluto being declassified would have been severely muted if not for the fact that Walt Disney decided to name his iconic cartoon dog, Pluto, after the Greek God of the Dead and Ruler of the Underworld.

Recently, for some inexplicable reason, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics decided to tackle the issue of Pluto’s planet-ness again.

Gingerich argued that “a planet is a culturally defined word that changes over time,” and that Pluto is a planet. Williams defended the IAU definition, which declares that Pluto is not a planet. And Sasselov defined a planet as “the smallest spherical lump of matter that formed around stars or stellar remnants,” which means Pluto is a planet.

Read more about STOP Trying to Make Pluto a Planet Again!